The importance of ‘leadership’ in environmental governance

For those who missed it, here is a link to the interview about Beyond Manapouri with Kathryn Ryan, Radio New Zealand, in which we discuss the critical importance of free and frank advice and national leadership in environmental governance:

Beyond Manapouri, 50 years of environmental politics

Aratiatia Rapids Clive Madge
Aratiatia Rapids (below Aratiatia Dam) on the Waikato River. Clive Madge

In this interview, Catherine Knight examines the catalogue of missed opportunities since the birthplace of the Manapouri environmental movement. Her new book, ‘Beyond Manapouri: 50 years of environmental politics in New Zealand’ is particularly critical of the lack of political leadership in the last 25 years. Catherine Knight is an Honorary Research Associate at the School of People, Environment and Planning at Massey University.

Preserving a lowland forest survivor on the volcanic plateau

Radio New Zealand’s “Country Life” programme is a favourite of mine – as a born-and-bred “townie” – I enjoy the insights it provides into living off the land – whether as a farmer, horticulturalist, or cottage industry owner. The programme also features stories which provide important insights from an environmental history perspective.

The most recent programme features a story about a southern Waikato farmer who, after growing up seeing the lowland indigenous forest around her town decimated by forestry, is covenanting 4 hectares of remnant bush on her farm in Mamaku [click here to view location] to ensure its future preservation. The bush is dominated by tawa, rimu and kahikatea, and is one of the last surviving remnants on this ignimbrite plateau which was once covered in dense forest. Continue reading