‘New Zealand’s Rivers’ is impressive for its scope, clarity, poignancy and power

Rivers coverIt is a daunting to have your work reviewed by someone as well respected in the field of environmental history as Graeme Wynn, Professor Emeritus in Geography, University of British Columbia. A relief to find it is a positive review, and an very nice indeed to read his assessment that “Catherine Knight is set fair to take her place among the country’s leading environmental historians”. Continue reading

‘Komorebi’ – sunlight filtering through leaves

skyward-view-of-kohekohe-grove
Light through the leaves of a kohekohe grove in Waikanae, Kapiti Coast. C. Knight

As part of my literature review for my book exploring the connection between nature and wellbeing in New Zealand, I have been reading Shinrin-yoku: The art and science of forest-bathing, by Dr Qing Li, who has researched the subject extensively in Japan.

Shinrinyoku LiIn describing the Japanese experience of spending time in a forested environment, he draws the reader’s attention to the Japanese word ‘komorebi’, 木漏れ日 in Japanese characters, meaning ‘sunlight filtering through leaves’ (木 = tree, 漏れ = leak through, 日 = sun). Continue reading

Nature & wellbeing in NZ – case study ideas please

nature_and_wellbeingAs you may have seen from an earlier post Can you help? The connection between nature & wellbeing  I am interested in exploring the connection between nature and wellbeing as the subject of my next book. In that earlier post, I asked for help finding existing literature on the topic, particularly in the New Zealand context. And I got some super-helpful responses, so thank you so much to everyone who responded! Continue reading

Coming up on 1 November: Exploring Manawatu’s past through photographs

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Looking forward to this event this Thursday November 1, as part of Local History Week 2018.

I will be taking the audience on a journey of discovery of the Manawatu’s past through the photographs of C.E. Wildbore and others. The event also marks the launch of Totara Press’s beautiful new (French-flapped) edition of Ravaged Beauty: An environmental history.

Wildbore: A photographic legacy will also be for sale at the event.

See event details here

Can you help? The connection between nature & wellbeing

woman in forest

I see that a focus of this year’s Mental Health Awareness week was ‘Letting nature in’, encouraging New Zealanders to get out and connect with nature, in light of its proven benefits for mental and spiritual wellbeing. (A survey undertaken by the Mental Health Foundation last year found that 95 per cent of New Zealanders reported a lift in mood after spending time in nature.) Continue reading

Treasuring our gully ecosystems

gullyDo other countries have ‘gullies’? – I am not sure. The dictionary tells me they are also known as ‘small valleys’ and ‘ravines’. ‘Valley’, even of the diminutive kind, seems a bit too bucoIic to me, while ‘ravine’ sounds way too treacherous (though in fairness, some gullies are pretty precipitous). Continue reading

The meaning of rivers in Aotearoa New Zealand

Whanganui RiverA paper exploring how the perception of rivers has changed over time has just been published in a special issue of the international journal River Research Applications, entitled The meaning of rivers in Aotearoa New Zealand – Past and present”.

This paper examines how attitudes towards rivers in Aotearoa New Zealand have
evolved since the country’s settlement by Europeans, two centuries ago. For most
of our postcolonial history, rivers have been viewed as something to be controlled
and managedeven improved. But today, rivers are increasingly being recognized
as embodying a broad range of values from the ecological to the spiritualnot simply
as a channel of water that can be exploited for human ends. Although much of this
evolving understanding stems from the advance in scientific knowledge, much too has
its roots in our collective past.

The paper can be viewed here: River Research Applications

New edition of “Ravaged Beauty” now available

Ravaged Beauty coverYes, the rumours are true! The sparkly new edition of “Ravaged Beauty: An environmental history of the Manawatu”, published by Totara Press, is now available! And it looks stunning. The French flaps are back by popular demand, the photographs are almost jumping off the page they look so good, and we have made a few design enhancements to make your reading experience all the more enjoyable.

But best of all? The price remains exactly the same, at $49.99.

Find more details, including flyer, here. Purchase from your local bookstore, or order online from Nationwide Book Distributors.